OV_10_Bronco_OV10_Marines_Airplane_Desktop_Wood_Model_Large_Free_Shipping_01_zm
ov-10

OV-10 Bronco OV10 Marines Airplane Desktop Wood Model Large Free Shipping

OV-10 Bronco OV10 Marines Airplane Desktop Wood Model Large Free Shipping

OV-10 Bronco OV10 Marines Airplane Desktop Wood Model Large Free Shipping
This pre-sale model is. Which has a production period of 1 month. If not, since we have our own factory, we can make one for you in a month. This magnificent and Museum-Quality crafted OV-10 BRONCO AIRPLANE WOOD MODEL is finely handmade from kiln-dried Wood Mahogany and skillfully hand-painted by gifted artists. It is 16.00″ in Length, with 15.20″ Wingspan, weighing 0.44 pounds, and a package weight of about 2.20 pounds. The picture shown in this listing is part of a set of photos we are using as reference for the production of the models. Each model comes with a wooden stand. Direct from our highly gifted Craftsmen & Artists, Each model is Individually Sculptured and Painted by hand, Not Mass-produced and there is No Reserve! We have been doing business WORLDWIDE for more that 8 years. HISTORY OV-10 Bronco The Bronco began with a specification approved by the U. Navy, Air Force and Army, a “tri-service” specification called “LARA” (the Light Armed Reconnaissance Aircraft), issued at the end of 1963. LARA was based on a perceived need for a new type of “jungle fighting” versatile light attack and observation aircraft. Existing aircraft (the O-1 Bird Dog and O-2 Skymaster) were perceived as obsolescent, with too small a cargo capacity for this flexible role. The specification called for a twin-engined, two-man aircraft that could carry at least 2,400 lb (1,100 kg) of cargo, six paratroops or stretchers, and be stressed for +8 and -3 Gs (basic aerobatic ability). It also had to be launchable from an aircraft carrier, fly at least 350 mph (560 km/h), take off in 800 feet (240 m) and convert to an amphibian. Various armament had to be carried, including four 7.62 mm machine guns with 2,000 rounds, and external weapons including a 20 mm gun pod and Sidewinder missiles. Eleven proposals were submitted, and seven made the first cut: the Beech PD 183, Douglas D. 855, General Dynamics/Convair Model 48 Charger, the Helio 1320, the Lockheed CL-760, a Martin design and the North American/Rockwell NA300. In August 1964, the NA300 was selected. A contract for seven prototype aircraft was issued in October 1964. General Dynamics/Convair protested the decision and built a prototype of the Model 48 Charger anyway, which first flew on November 29, 1964. This was also a twin-boom aircraft that had a broadly similar layout to the Bronco. The Charger, while capable of outperforming the OV-10 in some respects, crashed on October 19, 1965 after 196 test flights. Convair dropped out of contention. The Bronco started flying midway through the Charger’s test program on July 16, 1965 and became the premiere COIN (COunter INsurgence) aircraft of the next thirty years. The Bronco performed observation, forward air control, helicopter escort, armed reconnaissance, gunfire spotting, utility light air transport and limited ground attack. The Bronco has also performed aerial radiological reconnaissance, tactical air observation, artillery and naval gunfire spotting and airborne control of tactical air support operations, and front line, low-level aerial photography. It was first acquired by the U. Each of the Marine Corps’ two observation squadrons had 18 aircraft, 9 OV-10As and 9 OV-10Ds night observation aircraft. There was also a Marine Air Reserve squadron. The OV-10 was phased out of the Marine Corps in 1995. Marine Corps OV-10 Night Observation Gunship (NOGS) program modified four OV-10As to include a turreted forward-looking infrared (FLIR) sensor and turreted M197 20 mm gun slaved to the FLIR aimpoint. NOGS succeeded in Vietnam, but funds to convert more aircraft were not approved. NOGS evolved into the NOS OV-10D, which included a laser designator, but no gun. Operation as forward air controllers in the U. Marines continued through July 1994, when the Broncos were decommissioned. Doctrines changed as smart bombs were integrated with the force structure. Forward air control passed mostly to elite ground units with laser designators and digital radios. The concept of using loitering Broncos to deliver munitions was not explored. No one realized that they could deliver smart weapons more cheaply and promptly than jets. Broncos were reassigned to civil governments in the U. The USAF acquired the Bronco primarily as a forward air control (FAC) aircraft. The first USAF OV-10As for combat arrived in Vietnam on July 31, 1968. At least 157 OV-10As were delivered to the USAF before production ended in April 1969. In 1971, the 23d Tactical Air Support Squadron’s Broncos at Nakhon Phanom Royal Thai Air Force Base received PAVE NAIL modifications. NAIL was the radio handle of this squadron. PAVE was Loral Aerospace’s pod, mounted under the fuselage, containing a gyro stabilized optics system and in the back of the aircraft was a Loran-C navigational radio, and electronics to integrate them. PAVE NAIL illuminated targets for laser-guided precision bombs and used the laser/loran system to find downed aircrews. The program was very successful, but all this equipment was removed before the aircraft left South East Asia. The Air-Force generally disliked the Bronco because it flew low and slow compared to a jet, and when acting as a forward air control, it was vulnerable to anti-aircraft artillery. It therefore did not fit any of the perceived U. Air Force missions of the 1980s, and was removed from service. Navy formed VAL-4, in January 3, 1969, and operated in Vietnam from April through April, 1972. The Navy used the Bronco OV-10A as a light ground attack aircraft, for interdiction of enemy logistics, and fire-support of Marines, SEALs and river boats. It succeeded in this role. Indonesia and Thailand still fly COIN operations similar to the U. Navy’s Vietnam missions with their Broncos, but have retrofitted. 50-calibre (12.7 mm) Browning heavy machine guns in place of the light 7.62 mm. 30 calibre machine guns. Reportedly Broncos won most Thai bombing competitions until heavily automated F-5s became available. At one time Thailand even flew Broncos as air-defense. The Philippine Air Force flies Broncos on search-and-rescue and COIN operations in Mindanao. These are operated by the 15th Strike Wing based in Sangley Point, Cavite. Recent modifications by the PhAF included upgrades in the engine and propeller (now sporting a 4-bladed propeller), and flight controls and sensors. Specifications (OV-10) Wing Span- 40 ft, O in (12.19 m) Length- 41 ft, 7 in (12.67 m) Height- 15 ft, 2 in (4.62 m) Tailplane Span- 14 ft, 7 in (4.45 m) Weight Empty- 6,969 lb (3,161 kg) Normal Takeoff Weight- 9,908 lb (4,494 kg) Overload Takeoff Weight- 14,466 lb (6,563 kg) Performance Max level speed at sea level, no weapons: A: 244 knots (452 km/h; 281 mph) D: 240 knots (444 km/h; 276 mph) Max level speed at 10,000 ft (3,050 m) at Normal T-O weight (10,000 lb/4,536 kg): B: 241 knots (447 km/h; 278 mph) C: 341 knots (632 km/h; 393 mph) Range (with max weapon load, no loiter): 228 miles (198 nm; 367 km) Ferry range with aux. Fuel: 1, 428 miles (1,240 nm; 2,298 km) Takeoff Run: A, at normal weight: 740 ft (226 m) B, at 12,000 lb (5,443 kg): 1,130 ft (344 m) C, at 12,000 lb (5,443 kg): 550 ft (168 m) D, at 13,284 lb (6,025 kg): 1,110 ft (338 m) Landing Run: A, at normal weight: 740 ft (226m) A, at overload weight: 1,250 ft (381 m) D, at landing weight: 800 ft (244 m) lgm. After purchasing, pay instantly through! Payments are preferred because they are SAFE & SECURE. We are a Premier Merchant, both Verified and Confirmed. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Transportation\Aviation\Military Aircraft\Desk & Shelf Models”. The seller is “myasianart” and is located in this country: PH. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: Philippines
  • Dimension: 16.00\

OV-10 Bronco OV10 Marines Airplane Desktop Wood Model Large Free Shipping

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